The different cases are used depending on the function of the noun in the sentence. masculine: der Computer –> er. Log in! In both sentences, "das Haus" is the nominative subject. It denotes the basic form (i.e., the undeclined form) of the noun. Tags: Question 32 . Definite Articles in the German Accusative Case. The nominative case is one of four cases in the German language. Plural. Learn for free... Games; All our sites. False. personal pronouns dependent possessive pronouns; … The nominative articles for German nouns are the ones you may have already learned if you are a German beginner: der, ein = masculine. Whenever you feel ready for a self-assessment, try answering these quiz and worksheet questions on the German accusative case. German Cases Exercise – Masculine. feminine: die Bank –> sie. Placement tests. Previous Lesson Plural Forms. Accusative Dative Nominative Genitive Accusative or dative Accusative or nominative Nominative, accusative or dative All cases Accusative pronouns Dative pronouns Nominative pronouns Genitive pronouns. False. = used to indicate the noun to which something is given; to indicate the place where the subject is and … Are you looking to start figuring German ‘cases’ out? Er hat auch ein Freundin, die diese Szene mag, weil sie die Kostüme bewundert. Cases In order to be able to write accurately in German, it’s important to recognise and understand the four different cases: nominative, accusative, dative and genitive. Home; Report a bug : Learn German > German lessons and exercises > German test #18527 > Other German exercises on the same topic: … Online exercises to improve your German. The pronouns "you" and "it" remain the same in both the nominative and objective cases. After that, we will talk about the two different types of German nominative pronouns, the dependent and independent possessive pronouns. Online German Accusative Case Exercises. German Adjectives - Nominative Case. Introduction. FluentU is one of the best websites … Possessive pronouns (i.e. Dative Case. Relative pronouns: nominative & accusative: free exercise to learn German. Dative case: Ich bin in der Schule. die, eine = feminine. Our online exercises for German help you to learn and practice grammar rules in an interactive manner. Every time you learn a der, die, or das in front of a German noun, you’re using the nominative case — that’s knowledge and experience we can work with! Read the following sentence. In this episode: In this exercise, we'll practice and build intuition for German cases in normal everyday statements. ;) Masculine Feminine Neuter English … small words which replace nouns and establish possession) You will remember this pattern from the indefinite article table...yes, thankfully, it is exactly the same. Cases In order to be able to write accurately in German, it’s important to recognise and understand the four different cases: nominative, accusative, dative and genitive. The cases are an important part of German grammar as they are responsible for the endings of adjectives, indefinite articles and when to use which personal pronoun. But, of course, the German pronouns in the nominative case have different forms in German. Listen closely and use FluentU’s interactive subtitles and full transcripts to spot the different cases. Yup, that’s a thing now :)! Exercise 1; Accusative Case; Dative Case; Genitive Case; Prepositions I; Prepositions II . Click here to log in New account 4 million accounts created! So we’ll deal with a lot of aspects of cases at once – pronouns, definite articles, indefinite articles, cases and verbs, cases and prepositions, possessive pronouns. This might be a bit tricky for you to get your head around because you don’t use cases in English as much as in German. answer choices . When a noun or a pronoun is used as the subject of a verb, it is said to be in the nominative case. Our online exercises for German help you to learn and practice grammar rules in an interactive manner. The genitive case shows possession. The endings depend on the noun that comes after the possessive article, i.e. As already mentioned, word order isn’t very cruical in German, thus the subject of the sentence doesn’t always come first. Online exercises: Accusative & Dative (Part 1) Written by deutschforbeginners_m8spch on December 17, 2017. To make sure that you understand the correct answers, our answer keys offer simple explanations as well as handy tips and tricks.